Army fields next generation Network

Army fields next generation Network

Soldiers with the 10th Mountain Division started to receive the smart phones, radios and advanced satellites associated with Capability Set 13 that they will deploy with to Afghanistan at the start of next year.

Third and fourth brigade with the 10th Mountain Division are the first two brigades set to receive the upgraded communications gear from the Army has touted for the past year.

Army leaders have made the service’s Network its top priority and Capability Set 13 is the first wide-range deployment to come from those efforts. The Army stood up the Network Integration Evaluation to save its Network development efforts from falling into the same scrap heap where Future Combat Systems lies.


Of course, programs from FCS make up parts of Capabilities Set 13 to include Nett Warrior, which has now taken the form of the smartphones that soldiers with 10th Mountain will use in combat in Afghanistan next year.

The soldiers have started to train with the new communications gear to include their specially outfitted Mine Resistant Ambush Protected All Terrain Vehicles (M-ATVs) they had built to support the increased power requirements to support the communications gear.

Units with the 10th Mountain Division will arrive in Afghanistan during the brunt of the drawdown. The new communication system’s mobile design and ability to operate without fixed network infrastructure will keep soldiers connected even as the Army dismantles much of the force structure built up throughout Afghanistan.

“This capability will allow us to remain mobile and will not tie us to fixed facilities,” said Col. Walter E. Piatt, 10th Mountain Division’s deputy commanding general, said in a statement. “Think about what that does operationally and tactically. It doesn’t make you predictable.”

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“Units with the 10th Mountain Division will arrive in Afghanistan during the brunt of the drawdown. The new communication system’s mobile design and ability to operate without fixed network infrastructure will keep soldiers connected even as the Army dismantles much of the force structure built up throughout Afghanistan.”

Anyone ever stop to think that (to pick a random example among many) the Wanat failure was not down to a lack of super-duper high-tech digital gizmos?

It was instead the result of a complete loss of basic dusty-boot tactical knowledge, coupled to ludicrously restrictive lawfare rules of engagement.

A newly minted second lieutenant who had carefully read _The Defence of Duffer’s Drift_ and the _Vietnam Primer_, and absorbed their lessons, and who had the autonomy to make his own decisions based on local conditions, could well have completely averted that particular bloodsoaked catastrophe.

As well as a bunch of other catastrophes. To include the most recent one, the successful insurgent penetration of the Camp Bastion airfield.

(Where the infiltrators killed the unit CO and destroyed as much as 8% of the Marine VSTOL tacair fleet. In a single attack. What was that the USMC were saying about improvised forward basing of the F-35B?)

Unlike most other wasteful army programs WIN T and new rifleman radios are a needed and good buy hope hey get more.

Presumably inspired by Rorke’s Drift?

I don’t see that the need you cite for better training and RoEs (both of which I do not dispute) isn’t exclusive of commo modernization. Is it an either/or situation? I don’t think it is, unless G6/S6 somehow grabbed O&M dollars from everyone else to fund this.

Win T is needed.…and what about the troops needed to hold ground and secure areas from Taliban and AQ influence? Wait…they have new fangled radios! Taken from attacks on American bases that were over run or recently turned over, the Taliban will eventually have new fangled radios too and will gladly use technology against us!.…But, we sure have those new fangled radios!

“Of course, programs from FCS make up parts of Capabilities Set 13…”

Um, no. Nothing from FCS is any part of CS13. Not even if you start your sentence with “of course”.

Nett Warrior was never part of FCS, and even if it had been, the smartphones you cite were not a part of Nett Warrior (sorry, Land Warrior) back then.

Except that this stuff won’t get used. Not really. The infrastructure that is in place masks the fact that WIN-T’s bandwidth is unsuitable to the demands placed upon it. Start relying on what is organic and C2 will begin to weep. Add on the new demand that is facilitated by CS13, and it’ll scream in pain.

Like THAT never happens! [rolleyes]

Will this latest generation broad band high portable smart phone system work over and between the mountains in AFGN ?

Lots of misgivings, based on tactical concerns and technical limitations. But what is the alternative? As the Army takes down its infrastructure, CS13 seems to offer a good path to combat C2 and situational awareness.

While I agree with the above — I think another interesting approach to soldier communication and navigation is use of digital platforms — This interview might be of use to some: http://​www​.wbresearch​.com/​s​o​l​d​i​e​r​t​e​c​h​n​o​l​o​g​y​u​s​a​/so

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