Space intelligence platforms and space exploration

Wanted: Space Strategy

By John Reed on Monday, December 13th, 2010

Wanted: Space Strategy

Aimed at reducing redundancy and guiding government agency policies and investments, the Secure World Foundation’s National Space Strategy Project seeks the establishment of a space strategy taking into account the nation’s military, civilian government and commercial space needs in a way that reflects the county’s overall strategic goals, said the project’s principal investigator Eligar Sadeh during a press conference today in Washington to unveil the project.

Big Prez Export Changes Not Likely

By Colin Clark on Friday, December 10th, 2010

Big Prez Export Changes Not Likely

The aerospace and defense industries continue pushing arms export reform hard but several well-place sources within the industry say very little change is likely to happen in the next year. In the latest thrust, President Obama announced the beginnings of a yet another review of the Munitions List, which describes which weapons and parts are subject to the control of the State Department, and of the Department of Commerce’s version.

What Could X-37B Do?

By Colin Clark on Friday, December 3rd, 2010

What Could X-37B Do?

The wonderfully sort-of-secret X-37B is back on terra firma after a long stay in space. Very little information beyond its appearance, dimensions and the fact that the Air Force is deploying it is known about the vehicle, which looks a lot like a mini space shuttle. The vehicle can stay in orbit for at least nine months. Is it a sensor platform, a mobile satellite launcher, or…?

DoD Budget Strategy Shredded

By Colin Clark on Friday, December 3rd, 2010

DoD Budget Strategy Shredded

Cartwright Says Cuts Coming Defense Secretary Robert Gates’ budget strategy of deferring defense budget cuts by offering $100 billion in efficiencies looks to lie in tatters as pressure for Pentagon cuts rises to seemingly unstoppable levels. In the face of America’s fiscal strains, the nation must choose a new global strategy that better conforms to our ability to spend, three top defense experts argue. And the nation’s Nr. 2 uniformed officer says DoD is bracing for cuts.

Space Agencies Join For Savings

By Colin Clark on Thursday, December 2nd, 2010

Space Agencies Join For Savings

America’s top four space agencies — NASA, the NRO, Space and Missile Systems Command and the Missile Defense Agency — are joining together to improve how they design, buy and build launchers, sensors and satellites. The memorandum of understanding — signed so far by the spy satellite builders and operators at NRO and the SMC folks — will help them share information and work together.

Military Pay Freeze Floated

By Colin Clark on Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

Military Pay Freeze Floated

In a call that may well tip the scales in favor of serious cuts to the entire defense budget, senior House Democrat Steny Hoyer called today for active duty troops to take a pay freeze, just as their civilian counterparts will. Hoyer, the outgoing Majority Leader, offered an olive branch to those who might oppose the whole idea of a pay freeze for those who wear the uniform. He said he would exempt those deployed to combat zones.

Warren Mishap No Bar To START

By Colin Clark on Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

Warren Mishap No Bar To START

“My sense is that the START Treaty ought to be ratified and ought to be ratified as soon as possible.” Those are the words of one of America’s most experienced and respected nuclear arms experts, Air Force Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz, who also happens to be the man in charge of protecting, arming and delivering the Air Force’s share of nuclear weapons.

US Warns PRC of Anti-Sat Debris

By Colin Clark on Friday, October 29th, 2010

US Warns PRC of Anti-Sat Debris

Earlier this month, the State Department learned that debris from the Chinese weather satellite destroyed in their 2007 anti-satellite test would be coming uncomfortably close to another — functioning — Chinese satellite. So, like any good neighbor, State told China about the possibility of a collision. Did they listen?

Playing Piggyback in Space

By Josh Hartman on Monday, October 18th, 2010

Playing Piggyback in Space

Satellites are very expensive. The sensors on them are very expensive. Launching satellites is very expensive. One way the government has considered saving some of those costs is by piggybacking its sensors on commercial satellites. Known as hosted payloads, such packages have attracted considerable interest from the government. Josh Hartman, who was one of the Pentagon’s top space acquisition officials and is now with the Center for Strategic Space Studies, offers a step-by-step approach to get both sides closer to their goal.

DoD Must Share The Pain

By William D. Hartung on Wednesday, October 6th, 2010

DoD Must Share The Pain

The battle of the budget has been fully joined by the ideologues of the Democrats and Republicans this week. On the right, we have Monday’s op-ed in the Wall Street Journal by Arthur Brooks, Edwin Feulner and the redoubtable William Kristol in which they argue that the defense budget must not pay for the deficit. Now, on the left, we bring you the views of William Hartung of the New America Foundation. He has aimed high, for almost $1 trillion in cuts. We’ll see if this debate spreads beyond the Beltway and into the conversations of decent people over the dinner table and in bars.

On the Phone, Then Boom!

By Colin Clark on Monday, September 27th, 2010

On the Phone, Then Boom!

You’re a terrorist, dining with your paramour in a comfortable desert hideaway and one of your terrorist lieutenants calls with an operations update. Bored, your paramour rings her mother to complain about Abdul al Qaeda’s overweening focus on work. About 15 minutes later you hear a noise, look out the window and the next thing you know, you’re dead. That is a plausible scenario for the near future if the National Reconnaissance Office and its intelligence colleagues are able to further refine the accuracy of geolocation data and combine it with signals intelligence to allow such strikes.

Rumor: Fraser Tops For AF Chief

By Colin Clark on Friday, September 24th, 2010

Rumor: Fraser Tops For AF Chief

Three sources with access to senior Air Force officials say Air Combat Command’s Gen. William Fraser is the odds-on choice to replace Gen. Norton Schwartz as Air Force Chief of Staff. Fraser can operate in two of the service’s three domains, space and air, and he knows the often exquisitely complicated and sensitive issues surrounding the Air Force’s relationship with the intelligence community.

Space Tracking Not Good Enough

By Colin Clark on Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

Space Tracking Not Good Enough

When the Chinese J-12 satellite kissed another in orbit and raised alarms across the space community– was this an anti-satellite test — the event also raised questions about whether and when the U.S. knew it happened. “In general terms I am not satisfied with either the timeliness or quality or comprehensiveness of our space situational awareness.,” said Gen. Bob Kehler, head of Air Force Space Command.

Defense Mergers, Buyouts Loom

By Colin Clark on Friday, September 10th, 2010

Defense Mergers, Buyouts Loom

This week may come to be seen as the beginning of a new wave of consolidation and cost-cutting in the defense industry, one whose effects may be felt for decades. Lockheed Martin announced the coming departure of some 600 executives, 25 percent of its leadership team. And rumors surfaced that Boeing might buy Northrop Grumman.

Shelton To Lead Space Command

By Colin Clark on Thursday, September 9th, 2010

Shelton To Lead Space Command

UPDATED: OSD Makes Shelton Nom Official, Breedlove Picked For Air Vice Chief
Lt. Gen. William Shelton, Air Force assistant vice chief of staff and air staff director, will be nominated for a fourth star and has been proposed to lead Air Force Space Command. A key factor in Shelton’s promotion may well be that he played what one source says was “a key” role in the February 2008 shoot down of US 193, the highly classified but failed reconnaissance satellite.

Orbital Pushes ‘Cheap’ Taurus Rocket

By Colin Clark on Thursday, September 2nd, 2010

Orbital Pushes ‘Cheap’ Taurus Rocket

The iconic Space Shuttle has two launches left. The Delta II, workhorse for many of NASA’s scientific missions and for medium-sized Pentagon and intel payloads, also faces retirement in fall next year. Once the shuttle and Delta II are retired the United States will face the prospect of a serious decline in its ability to build, launch and maintain liquid propelled rockets. Into that breach Orbital Sciences hopes to step with its Taurus II rocket, a medium payload system for NASA, the intelligence community and the Pentagon to use.

PRC Satellites Kiss: ASAT Test?

By Colin Clark on Thursday, September 2nd, 2010

PRC Satellites Kiss: ASAT Test?

In space warfare one man’s refueling or repair capability can look an awful lot like another man’s ability to destroy or cripple your satellite. Now one Chinese satellite has approached another and, apparently, bumped its target and changed the orbit. U.S. analysts of Chinese space efforts seem to agree, so far, that this was not an anti-satellite test.

OK WH Export Changes, LockMar CEO Urges Hill

By Colin Clark on Tuesday, August 31st, 2010

OK WH Export Changes, LockMar CEO Urges Hill

In an exclusive interview with DoD Buzz, Lockheed Martin CEO Bob Stevens says he hopes Congress looks favorably on the Obama administration’s proposed arms export control reforms because it will make U.S. companies more competitive, help generate U.S. jobs and better protect crucial U.S. technology.

$1 TRILLION Bought Older, Smaller Forces; Fix it, Mr. Gates

By Winslow Wheeler on Monday, August 30th, 2010

$1 TRILLION Bought Older, Smaller Forces; Fix it, Mr. Gates

The United States has spent $2 trillion since 1998 on wars and regular defense spending and has been left “with a smaller Navy and Air Force and a tiny increase in the size of the Army,” argues Winslow Wheeler, defense analyst at the Center for Defense Information. If Defense Secretary Robert Gates is serious about restructuring the military and what it buys, then he better get going or he’ll be a “wasted asset,” Wheeler says.

Donley Pushes Major Space Changes

By Colin Clark on Thursday, August 26th, 2010

Donley Pushes Major Space Changes

With the stroke of a pen Air Force Secretary Mike Donley engaged one of the most complex bureaucratic challenges faced by the service: how to buy, build and manage satellites and the rockets that move them into space. In perhaps the biggest change, Donley vested the service’s undersecretary, Erin Conaton, with the responsiblity for guiding all space policy activities overseen by the Air Force. The assistant secretary for acqusiution will now lead all space acquisition, combining traditional fighter, bomber and other service acquisition with space.

AdChoices | Like us on , follow us on and join us on Google+
© 2014 Military Advantage
A Monster Company.